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What are your plans for this summer? I sure hope they include some awesome trips, maybe like the GSNI St. Louis Trip. Spend 5 days and 4 nights exploring the Gateway to the West. Travel by bus and spend your nights in a cozy hotel next to the Arch. View the Zoo, the City Museum, join us for a river cruise, and do so much more. If you are in grades 5-12, this is the trip for you. Sign up today.

Tagged in: 2015 travel

Ever wonder what camp is all about? Today Heather, also known as "Snow White", shares her memories of Camp McCormick.


My name is Heather, and I have been a Girl Scout for fifteen years. I joined as a Daisy in kindergarten and am now a junior in college and a lifetime member of Girl Scouts. My experiences as a member of this organization have positively impacted my life and made me the young woman I am today.




Throughout my years as a Girl Scout, I have enjoyed spending time at camp. I attended day camp in the summer, spent weekends at camp with my troop and my younger sister's troop, and have been part of the resident camp staff for five years. I believe that everyone deserves to experience the opportunities that camp has to offer. Camp can change your life—it definitely changed mine!


Some of my earliest camp memories are from being a day camper at Camp McCormick. During my days at camp, I quickly fell in love with camp life. I had so much fun learning new songs and making new friends. A few of my favorite activities included swimming, arts and crafts, tie-dying, and going to the trading post. I even remember my counselors: Kermie, Daisy, and Aerofly!

Tagged in: 2015 camp camp mccormick

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Today GSNI CEO, Fiona Cummings, writes about the value of our volunteers to kick off Volunteer Appreciation Month.


People often ask me what the difference is between working for a for-profit and a non-profit organization. Apart from the level of monetary rewards, certain accounting processes and our ability to expand our markets, the largest difference of all is that for-profits mostly deliver their mission with paid staff and non-profits rely heavily on volunteers to deliver their mission.


We are at the time of the year when we recognize and thank our volunteers, without whom, GSNI and, indeed Girl Scouts as an organization, would not exist. In total, we have 2,303 active volunteers, of which 2,271 are women and 32 are men. Our volunteers run troops, help organize the Girl Scout Cookie Program, manage Service Units, lead programs, organize and help at events, organize alumnae, help raise funds, are active board and committee members, train and mentor other adults and hold many other roles.

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Are you planning on helping at GSNI’s Camp Service Days at Camp McCormick or Camp Dean? Planning on volunteering at Camp even though you have already finished your requirements for Program Aide Award? Make those hours work for you!

Did you know that Cadettes, Seniors, and Ambassadors all have an award called the Service to Girl Scouting bar? They sure do. To earn it, just spend 20 hours volunteering for Girl Scouts. That isn’t so hard, and it is actually a lot of fun. Consider volunteering with a younger troop, helping out at camp, or coming to a service day. Those don’t work for you? Check in with us now and then to see where we could use a helping hand.

Tagged in: 2015 awards

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By: Guy Schmale, Camp Dean Ranger
As we head into spring, you may notice evidence of fire across large natural areas in some of our camps. These fires were prescribed to help restore native prairie, savanna, and forest habitats. 
Fire is a natural part of these landscapes and before the arrival of European settlers, they burned more frequently. Fires were started by lightning strikes and meteor impacts. Native Americans also used fire to drive game, to clear land, and as a weapon. Back then, the landscape was not divided by highways, big agriculture, or other development. Because of this, fires would burn a long time and cover great distances.
Over the last century, the attitude in the U.S. was to put out all fires as quickly as we could to protect people and property. Only in recent decades have ecologists come to understand how removing fire is actually harming the balance of native ecosystems. When fire burns through an area, only plants that can resist or evade the flames are able to survive. They may have adaptations such as thicker bark or deeper roots. Potential competitors that are not suited to fire are set back or killed—leaving more resources like water and light to reach those that remain. 
Tagged in: 2015 camp